The Big Apple

The Brooklyn Bridge

Spanning the East River between Manhattan and Brooklyn, the Brooklyn Bridge is an architectural marvel of 19th century engineering. Opened in 1883, it is about 6000 feet long and sits 127 feet above the river. The pedestrian walkway is 18 feet above the traffic lanes.

The suspension bridge was the first of it’s kind to use steel for the cable wire. The bridge is open to cars, bikes and pedestrians. Although it only spans the river of about 1500 feet, being more than a mile long and often take an hour or so to traverse mighty East River.

Just before it was scheduled to open, someone started a rumor that the bridge was going to collapse. To put the rumors to rest (and to promote his circus)The Greatest Showman, PT Barnum led a parade of 21 elephants, including his star attraction Jumbo, across the Brooklyn Bridge.

The New York Times reported on the spectacle. “At 9:30 o’clock 21 elephants, 7 camels, and 10 dromedaries issued from the ferry at the foot of Courtlandt-Street… The other elephants shuffled along, raising their trunks and snorting as every train went by. Old Jumbo brought up the rear.” It went on to observe that “To people who looked up from the river at the big arch of electric lights it seemed as if Noah’s Ark were emptying itself over on Long Island.”

Did you know that there were hidden wine cellars in the bridges towers. New York City rented out the space in order to fund it’s construction. They were eventually closed in the 1930’s, but in 1978, a faded inscription was found.

“Who loveth not wine, women and song, he remaineth a fool his whole life long.”

Categories: hdr, New York City, Photography, The Big Apple, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment
 
 

Late night in Times Square

Spending a few weeks in New York City, I had lots of time to explore. One of the most interesting places is Times Square. It’s loud, bright, colorful, smells funny and is full of unique individuals. Named after the New York Times, Times Square was their headquarters beginning in 1905. By the end of World War I, most theaters had moved uptown to Times Square. High-end hotels and restaurants attract over 50 million visitors a year. On any given day, almost 350,000 pedestrians cross Times Square.

Statue of George M Cohan

In 1959 a statue honoring Broadway composer, George M. Cohan was erected in the square. His song “Give My Regards to Broadway” became a well know standard all over the world.

Vendors selling “Street Meat” can be found every few feet

If you’re feeling a bit hungry on your way, you may stop at one of the dozens of food vendors operating out of their mobile carts. “Dirty water” dogs are a popular staple in Times Square.

Looking for a souvenir? There’s a lot to choose from.

You can find everything here from Mickey Mouse hats to Hershey’s Chocolate, M&Ms, Hard Rock, The MTV Store, The CBS Store, Sanrio and Sephora. No matter what you’re looking for, you are bound to find it here.

Categories: New York City, Photography, The Big Apple, Times Square, Travel | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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