Posts Tagged With: architecture

The Art Of The Pub

Categories: Europe, hdr, London, Photography, Pubs, SIgns, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Church of The Templars

While walking along Fleet Street, just past Wildly & Sons bookshop, keep an eye out for small stone arch. Just above the arch is an elaborate Jacobean Townhouse. This is the portal to “Temple”, once the stronghold of The Knights Templar.

Famously known as a Medieval order, The Knights Templar, are integral figures in The Crusades. The knights protected pilgrims along the dangerous route to Jerusalem. They became incredibly wealthy by running a sort of bank for the pilgrims. Before setting out on their journey, a pilgrim would give the knights all of their money in exchange for a promissory note to be redeemed in Jerusalem.

Fans of The Da-Vinci Code will remember the puzzling “In London lies a knight a Pope interred. His labour’s fruit a Holy wrath incurred. You seek the orb that out be on his tomb. It speaks of Rosy flesh and seeded womb.

Tom Hanks character, Robert Langdon finds himself at Temple Church to find it’s answer.

Should you be on your own Grail Quest check out the Temple’s website for information on how to visit.

http://www.templechurch.com/

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Spirited Theaters

One thing London does not have a shortage of is haunted places. On my sprint through the city, I mapped out a few spooky locations. Due to the pandemic and the hour of my journey, I wasn’t able to venture into any of them, but they still have that sense of something other worldy lurking in the shadows.

In St. Martin’s Lane, it was originally called The New Theater in 1903. The Noel Coward Theater has the distinction of being the home of it’s original manager, Sir Charles Wyndham. Sir Charles managed both the New Theater and the Wyndham Theater, which sits behind it.

If you see a debonair gray haired man walking the hallways or entering the dressing rooms, say hello to Sir Charles.

Towards the end of WWI, a group of friends were enjoying a performance at The London Coliseum. They noticed a friend of theirs walking down the aisle. Strangely, he disappeared into thin air. On his last day before being deployed, this young soldier had seen a production at The Coliseum. Later, the friends were notified that he had been killed in battle. There were sightings of the young soldier for many years after.

For more stories about Haunted London check out this book by my good friend, Rob Gutro.

Categories: Haunted Travel, hdr, London, Photography, Theaters, Theatres, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Louisville: A Spirited City

When you hear the name, Louisville, you think about bourbon, the Kentucky Derby, Muhammad Ali and the Louisville Slugger. The largest city in Kentucky, Louisville is home to over one and a quarter million people. Known as the “Gateway to the South” and “The Derby City”, Louisville has something for everyone.

Some of the most unique architecture can be found in Louisville. Old Louisville is home to some fascinating mansions.

Downtown has art galleries and public sculpture on every corner.

And don’t forget the racehorses…

When you walk around Louisville, be sure to checkout the wonderful painted horses. Each one is unique and has it’s own story. Begun as a civic pride initiative in 2004. More horses were added in 2005 and 2015.

Categories: hdr, Photography, Photography, street art, Theaters, Theatres, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Ghosts Of St. Paul’s

Halloween is the perfect time of the year to experience a ghost tour. The city of London has a vast array of these tours, you can choose The Theater District, Jack The Ripper or any of a number of cool locations.

The Cathedral of St. Paul may be known the spot where Mary Poppins and the children meet the bird woman. But by night, the location takes on an eerie appearance.

The Whistler is St. Paul’s most well-known haunting. Many have seen the visage of an elderly clergyman accompanied by a tuneless whistle. Your best chance of meeting the clergyman is to visit the Cathedral’s west end. On the ground floor of the northwest tower. When the tower was rededicated after WWI, a previously hidden door was uncovered. This is the exact spot where the whistling cleric appears to fade into the wall.

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There are 2 other ghost stories captured by Irish writer and Ghost Hunter, Elliott O’Donnell. In one story an American couple experience a “great black cloud” that rose out of the floor and climbed 20 feet into the air before disappearing. They described the cloud as “alive'”.

O’Donnell’s second story involves a woman who was resting in the cathedral one afternoon. This woman spotted another woman in a pew in front of her. She seemed to be frantically looking for something. The first woman got up to help the woman, but on her way down the aisle she felt a tap on her shoulder. She spun around to find no one behind and when she resumed her walk, the other woman had vanished.

Several days later, at the same time of day, the woman saw the figure of the woman once again. She rose to offer assistance but was once again stopped by a tap on her shoulder. Just as before, there was no one behind her and in front of her the woman was gone.

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LINKS:

Walking Tours of London

St. Paul’s Cathedral

Categories: Church, Europe, Haunted Travel, London, Photography, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hey, Hey, We’re The Monks

No trip to Tallin, Estonia is complete without a visit to the Danish King’s Garden. Watching over the medieval walled garden are statues of faceless monks, Ambrosius, Bartholomeus and Claudius. The legend goes, that during a losing battle, the monks prayed for divine intervention on behalf of the Danish King. Out of the sky fell a large flag, which became the national flag of Denmark.

Estonia is also considered one of the most haunted places in Europe. The King’s Garden is said to be haunted by a monk, perhaps a former executioner having a change of heart.

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LINKS

Visit Estonia

Categories: Church, Estonia, Photography, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

There are more things in heaven and earth

Legend has it that Shakespeare wrote his masterpiece Hamlet, with Kronborg Castle as it’s setting. The mystery remains as to whether or not he actually visited Denmark. In 1816, on the 200th anniversary of his death, the soldiers garrisoned at Kronborg performed his play for the first time. 

When you arrive at the castle, make a point of checking out the days schedule as in the Summer months, Hamlet is performed live on the castle grounds.CPH1_-279I arrived just in time to head to the King’s Chamber for Ophelia’s mad scene. 

“We know what we are, but know not what we may be.”

Elsinore1_-2“Good-night, ladies, good-night, sweet ladies, good-night, good-night.”CPH1_-136In between scenes, Queen Gertrude works on her crewel in her chamber.CPH1_-137

CPH1_-280One woe doth tread upon another’s heel, 
So fast they follow. Your sister’s drown’d, Laertes.”CPH1_-281“But to know a man well were to know himself.”CPH1_-282“The Queen carouses to thy fortune, Hamlet.”CPH1_-283“No, no! the drink, the drink! O my dear Hamlet! 
The drink, the drink! I am poison’d.”Elsinore1_“It is here, Hamlet. Hamlet, thou art slain”CPH1_-284

Good Night Sweet Prince

LINKS

Shakespeares-Danish-links

BBC Elsinore A Castle Fit For A Prince

Hamlet Live 2017 Facebook

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Kronborg Slot

Standing guard high on a promontory in Helsingor, Kronborg Slot (Kronborg Castle) was the home of Denmark rulers until the 1600’s. CPH1_-141

In 1785, the castle was being fitted for use as army barracks. The chapel was outfitted as a gym and fencing hall. The chapel was later refurnished with the original furniture and reinaugurated in 1843

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Detail of the main entrance to the chapel. CPH1_-286The chapel features the original pews dating back to King Frederik II.CPH1_-287CPH1_-139CPH1_-138The casements deep beneath the castle are a unique experience. Dimly lit and at times a bit treacherous, the casements are fun to explore but watch your step.CPH1_-288This subterranean labyrinth is where you can meet Holger. According to the myth of King Arthur, a Danish king known as Holger the Dane, was kidnapped by the sorceress, Morgan le Fay and taken to Avalon. He escaped to rescue France from danger and then traveled to Kronborg castle. Today he sleeps until he is needed to save his homeland. CPH1_-289

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LINKS

Visit Denmark

Kronborg Wiki

 

Categories: Castles, Church, Copenhagen, Europe, Hamlet, Kronborg Castle, Photography, Travel | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Public houses, merriment and generous women

In 1671, King Christian began work on a new harbor for Copenhagen. Nyhavn has been the home of Danish artists such as Hans Christian Andersen and countless writers, ballerina and musicians. CPH1_-76The brightly colored buildings are home to restaurants, shops and clubs. Once a notorious red light district, activities today range from getting a new tattoo to cruising along the canals on a flat boat.CPH1_-96At one time the area was frequented by sailors who came for the seedy taverns and loose women. Today, the area is a vibrant neighborhood where you can enjoy one of the bars and restaurants or purchase a bottle of wine and sit on the wall overlooking the canal. This stretch is referred to as the longest bar in Scandanavia. CPH1_-97In the old days, the neighborhood was split into the Sunny Side and The Shady Side. Today both sides are family friendly. CPH1_-99

CPH1_-100One of the unique restaurants is called KOMPASSET (The Compass) – the building used to house several manufacturers of compasses.  KOMPASSET features a menu of  smørrebrød/open sandwiches and craft beers from local breweries.CPH1_-101As you walk along the waterfront, don’t forget to look up. This building features a diving helmet as a monument to Em. Z. Svitzer Bjergnings Enterprise, a marine salvage company.

CPH1_-102In the mood for a burger, try Hereford House, but don’t be surprised at the price. A burger and beer can set you back more than $20 USD.
CPH1_-103For the adventurous drinker, the ideal place to order a shot of Fisk “Fisherman’s Friend” vodka, Ga-Jol liquorice vodka, Akvavit or Gammel Dansk is the Fisken Pub. Located in the basement of the Skipperkroen Restaurant, the abundance of nautical decor gives you the feeling of what it may have been like to visit here 350 years ago.CPH1_-104Hyttefadet is a good little restaurant for a quick Danish lunch of an open faced salmon sandwich and a beer. Sit back and watch the world go by. CPH1_-105Nyhavn 17 is a more elegant dining choice. CPH1_-106Heering is a cozy restaurant, known for traditional Danish entrees as well as European Bistro specialties. The inside is very small and don’t be surprised if your dinner is interrupted by servers poking you to move out their way as you eat.CPH1_-107Hong Kong is one of the old school strip clubs and bars in Copenhagen. If you’re looking for a local dive bar with a rough clientele, this may be the spot for you.CPH1_-108If you visit Copenhagen, a trip to Nyhavn is well worth a few hours of your time.CPH1_-109

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LINKS:

The Compass Restaurant

Hyttefadet

Nyhavn17 on Facebook

Restaurant Heering

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Nice Knockers

The homes of Cartegena are dressed in tropical and flowering vines. Door knockers or Aldabas reflected the status of family in residence. They spoke to the families social and economic status without saying a word. The door knocker came about in the middle ages when most people could not read or write. The pictorial images were the ultimate status symbol. Although today they are merely ornamental, they hearken back to the family’s status and wealth. Cartagena1_-17Nautical motifs that feature creatures of the sea such as fish and mermaids were used by families that made their living by the sea. Usually as merchants importing goods into the New World or traders. Cartegena1_-27

Cartegena1_-19Lions were the symbol of the military. It is the epitome of strength, pride and power. The protectors of the city lived behind these doors.Cartagena1_-13

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Cartagena1_-15Aldabas shaped like lizards refer back to the country’s royalty. Families with these often were members of royal family or could produce a connetion to the royals. Cartegena1_-14Both the size of the knocker and the material that it was made of, were also important indicators of the family’s status. The actual meaning of the different styles comes into question quite often. Where some say the Lion represents the military, others say it is meant for teachers. And if the lizard is truly a symbol of royalty, there must have been a huge royal family living in Cartegena based on the dozens of lizard aldabas that I saw. Any way you look at them, the aldabas are beautiful bits of decoration on some wonderful homes. Cartegena1_-15

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