The Ghostly Monk of Westminster Abbey

It’s inevitable that Westminster Abbey would be haunted. More than 3,000 bodies are buried on the grounds. Long ago in the 6th century the area where Westminster sits was an island on the banks of the Thames. Originally called The Collegiate College of St. Peter, Westminster Abbey is the most important churches in London.

Many people have reported seeing the spirit of a monk floating above the ground in the cloisters. It is believed that this is Father Benedictus, who served as a Benedictine monk of the abbey. The monk is said to appear around five or six in the evening. His figure appears to be solid, and he has been known to engage visitors in conversation. It is not uncommon for a guest to encounter Father Benedictus and hold a lengthy conversation before he backs up and melts into a wall.

The facade of Westminster Abbey is covered in extremely detailed carvings of Saints and Gargoyles. Technically, a Gargoyle is a water spout, other creatures are Grotesques or Chimeras taking the place of architectural corbels or supports. My favorite is a sculpture of a little bat.

Within the Abbey lies the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, a memorial to the soldiers who died in World War 1. On 11th November 1920, an unidentified soldier’s body was given a royal funeral and buried in soil brought form the battlefield in France. Underneath a marble stone quarried in Belgium the unknown warrior lies in eternal rest. On occasion, once the crowds have left the Abbey and the halls are silent, a spectral soldier appears next to the tomb. He materializes slowly and stands quietly for a time with his head bowed. After a few minutes he simply dissolves into thin air.

If you’d like to visit The Abbey for yourself, you can find all of the important information here

https://www.westminster-abbey.org/

Categories: Haunted Travel, Travel, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

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